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Chartbook #187: MLK’s economic radicalism & the strange birth of the Fed’s dual mandate

In the last ten years, the familiar boundaries of the political debate on the US have been challenged by a convergence of arguments about racial justice, economics and inequality. This conjunction in its contemporary form dates back to the early 2010s when the ferment in economic debates in the aftermath of 2008 and the differential impact of that crisis on black and latino households, coincided with the election of Barack Obama, the Occupy movement, which spawned the 1 percent v. 99 percent discourse, the upsurge in interest in inequality supercharged by the success of Thomas

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Chartbook #186 Solicitous dictatorship. The political economy of authoritarianism – Aly v. Tooze revisited.

“In some periods they explain practically all major events, and in most periods they explain a great deal … But even greater than the causal is the symptomatic significance of fiscal history. The spirit of the people, its cultural level, its social structure, the deeds its policy may prepare … all this and more is written in fiscal history. He who knows how to listen to its message here discerns the thunder of world history more clearly than anywhere else.” Regular readers of the newsletter will know my fondness for this clarion call for fiscal

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Chartbook #183: The Christmas Tree & the great acceleration – from Strasbourg to Shanghai

Vogue cover by Salvador Dali December 1946 Christmas trees are BIG business. Each year approximately 33 to 36 million Christmas trees are produced in North America and 50 to 60 million trees are produced in Europe. In the United States, there are an estimated 15,000 growers, which includes 5,000 choose and cut farms. Over half of the trees grown in the United States are harvested in only seven counties — three in North Carolina, three in Oregon, and one in Michigan. The top producer, Ashe County in North Carolina, harvested almost two million trees in 2017.

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Chartbook #182 Washington’s disruptive new consensus.

If you travel to South Korea or Europe right now, the talk in international economic policy circles is all about one thing: America’s “giant” Inflation Reduction Act and its $500 billion in subsidies for green energy and industry in the United States. I did an op ed for the FT on the question of how Europe is reacting to the IRA. Cameron Abadi and I took up the issue of US trade policy more generally on the podcast this week, focusing less on the IRA and more on the WTO. Whilst in Berlin I did

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on twitter

RT @nixon_apple: This summary of the crisis in Adani family companies and its implications for India is worth a read. As the chart suggests…

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This piece by Pranab Bardhan on the political economy of the "New India" newleftreview.org/issues/ii136/a… pairs well with Chartbook #190 on the Adani crisis adamtooze.substack.com/p/chartbook-19… https://t.co/an8XXeNPac

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RT @Beuysaunt: @adam_tooze @CPR_India This NLR piece is worth a read. Not all that glitters is gold… newleftreview.org/issues/ii136/a…

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on twitter

RT @nixon_apple: This summary of the crisis in Adani family companies and its implications for India is worth a read. As the chart suggests…

Read More »

This piece by Pranab Bardhan on the political economy of the "New India" newleftreview.org/issues/ii136/a… pairs well with Chartbook #190 on the Adani crisis adamtooze.substack.com/p/chartbook-19… https://t.co/an8XXeNPac

Read More »

RT @Beuysaunt: @adam_tooze @CPR_India This NLR piece is worth a read. Not all that glitters is gold… newleftreview.org/issues/ii136/a…

Read More »

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